Natu Collective: Zero-Waste Wedding made it possible!

Laura A. Hernandez is the founder of Gwinnett Recycles, a grassroots community organization, and the Facebook group Zero Waste Gwinnett. She is a co-founder of Come Clean Gwinnett, which aims to empower citizens to reduce litter and blight. She hates to see anything go to waste and believes that Gwinnett County’s nearly one million residentsContinue reading “Natu Collective: Zero-Waste Wedding made it possible!”

Will bioplastics fix the plastic waste crisis?

Confused about compostable, biodegradable, eco-friendly? Who is not? With environmental awareness being brought to a wider audience, there are many companies launching new materials in an effort to reduce carbon footprint, which is great! The unfortunate result is a bit more confusion to an already very confused consumer, who wants to do better but doesn’tContinue reading “Will bioplastics fix the plastic waste crisis?”

Transparent is the new green

We understand that sometimes colored packaging is used to preserve a brand and its design identity, so consumers recall their favorite product when shopping. Think of green Sprite®, or red Tide® detergents. Did you know that some of those products are changing their packaging colors? And most importantly, do you know why? Coca-cola, for example,Continue reading “Transparent is the new green”

Tis the season… to take out the trash!

Did you know that between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, Americans produce 25% more trash than usual? That’s about one million extra tons of garbage each week! All that wrapping paper, glitter, ribbons… which have an average lifetime of… 60 seconds? Give or take! $12 billion worth of packing material is spent every holiday seasonContinue reading “Tis the season… to take out the trash!”

Candy Wrappers Nightmare

A recent report from Ocean Conservancy found candy & snack wrappers as the top litter in the ocean. For 34 years it was cigarettes butts. Trash end up in the ocean not just because people litter. A big part of the problem is that recycling infrastructure is not in place to reincorporate all materials back into production. Candy wrappers are not recyclable. They are light and fly from the garbage trucks and landfills, ending up in rivers and ultimately the oceans.