Transparent is the new green

We understand that sometimes colored packaging is used to preserve a brand and its design identity, so consumers recall their favorite product when shopping. Think of green Sprite®, or red Tide® detergents.

Did you know that some of those products are changing their packaging colors? And most importantly, do you know why?

Coca-cola, for example, rolled out Sprite clear bottles (plastic and glass) in 2019 in Europe and is gradually changing it globally. The shift from its iconic green bottle means that more Sprite bottles can be collected, recycled and reused to make new ones. While colored plastic bottles can be recycled, a change from colored to transparent will significantly increase the value of the plastic in the after-use market. Meaning that the plastic can be repurposed or reused many times, creating a circular solution. Simple and smart, right?

Photo by Charlotte May on Pexels.com

Black or colored packaging have limited transformation possibilities. They need to be separated from the main colors such as natural and white. This is achievable, though it does mean that the bulk of the remaining materials are composed of various colors that create a new natural “self-colored grey” color once blended and extruded to granules. Herein the lower market value.

The Sprite example is just one on how brand-owners need to take additional transformational steps when it comes to their packaging design. The same applies to other colors and other resins, that face the same recycling constraints, such as colored high-density polyethylene (HDPE) – your milk jug – and polypropylene (PP)  – your detergent jug.

Is it hard for consumers to evolve with a brand towards sustainability? Not at all!

Now think of your black takeout container? Depressing, right?

Next time, chose transparent packaging or NO packaging!

3 thoughts on “Transparent is the new green

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